Sunday, May 1, 2016

PowerUp Spring Series 2016 - Meet 2


Welcome to Meet 2 of PowerUp Spring Series 2016! From May to June of 2016, players will be able to earn Ranking Points in Street Fighter V, Mortal Kombat X, Killer Instinct, and also Pokken Tournament. The Top 4 point earners in each game will be invited to participate in the Spring Series 2016 Championship to be held in July.

May 21st, 2016 is Meet 2 of Spring Series 2016.

We are a strong community of players who wish to grow interest in fighting games, create lasting partnerships within the region, and encourage the online warriors to step up the challenge of an in-person event.

WHERE

Arcade Legacy
662 Cincinnati Mills Drive
Cincinnati, OH 45240

FEES

Venue Fee: $5 for tournament players
SFV Entry Fee: $10
MKXL Entry Fee: $10
KI Entry Fee: $5
PT Entry Fee: $5

SCHEDULE & CONSOLE

All events begin at 6:00pm. In-person registration for all games ends at 5:20pm.
SFV (PS4)
MKXL (PS4)
KI (XBONE)
PT (WIIU)

This is a BYOC event (Bring Your Own Controller). There are no guarantees that Arcade Legacy, PowerUp, or other players will provide you with controllers.

STREAM

twitch.tv/arcadelegacy

CONNECT

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PowerUpFighters
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Osirun
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerUpFighters
Website: http://www.powerupfighters.org/
Brutality Club: https://www.facebook.com/groups/454333527975618/

POWER RANKINGS

In each game, players earn ranking points based on how they place in the bracket. There are three meets in Spring Series 2016, and points are dispersed as follows:

1st = 9pts

2nd = 8pts
3rd = 7pts
4th = 6pts
5th = 5pts
7th = 4pts
9th = 3pts
13th = 2pts
17th and Below = 1pt

The Top 4 point earners for a game will earn an invitation to compete in a Championship Round Robin for prizes and glory. If there is a tie in points for Top 4, then all the players who have earned the necessary points will earn an invitation to the Championship Round Robin.

Meet 1 of each series is randomly seeded, and then considerations are made for where players live, but only if those players have pre-registered. Meet 2 and Meet 3 begin using the power rankings to seed players in the bracket, but again, players must pre-register to take advantage of this seeding. Considerations are still made for where players live, but ranking points are more important. Players who have no ranking points, and join mid-series, receive a bottom seed and are inserted into the bracket where they fit. Considerations are made for where players live, but again the ranking points are more important.

PRE-REGISTRATION

Pre-registration is available at no cost on Smash.gg

We also take equipment donation reservations during pre-registration.

https://smash.gg/tournament/powerup-spring-series-2016-meet-2
If you would like to be seeded in the brackets such that we take into consideration city / game team / and so on, then you MUST pre-register. In-person registrants will be randomly seeded into the bracket(s) with no consideration for city / game team / and so on. 

If you would like for your earned ranking points to be used toward your placement in the bracket, then you also MUST pre-register. In-person registrants will be randomly seeded into the bracket(s) with no consideration for earned ranking points.

Failure to pay pre-registration fees upon arrival at the venue will disallow you from entering intended tournaments. This is to prevent excessive byes in the brackets.

These steps are being taken to ensure faster bracket creation and a smoother event. Thank you for your understanding.

KENTOKYO BATTLE CIRCUIT

The PowerUp Series is proud to be a part of the Kentokyo Battle Circuit seeding system! Fight hard to earn points in SFV and MKX!

In brackets of 8-31 players, Top 3 earn seeding points. In brackets of 32 players or more, Top 16 earn seeding points.

For more information about #KBC, please go to the official website: http://kentokyocon.com/index.php/conevents/kentokyo-battle-circuit/

CURRENT POWER RANKINGS

SFV
9pts – 0tter
8pts - Mod
7pts - Unlucky
6pts - Plum
5pts - Servo
5pts - NB | Squall
4pts – NB | ZachInABox
4pts - Ailerus
3pts – NB.DCB | ElitheCurry
3pts – AL | Arkayne
3pts – MPII The Ronin
3pts - Hornett2pts – TigerZord92
2pts – NB | immortal
2pts - Steel
2pts – Derrick Legend
1pt - Solumindra
1pt - SOQIO
1pt - RedMufflerMan
1pt – Mad Marx
1pt – FeS | Matto
1pt – Dual Kevin
1pt - Tama
1pt - Trickster
1pt - Ryujin

MKXL

9pts - AL | Mod 
8pts – Action Jackson
7pts - Hornett
6pts – Mad Marx
5pts – AL | Arkayne
5pts – NB | Squall
4pts – MPII The Ronin
4pts - J
3pts - GrandPappyChris
3pts – TSS | Terror
3pts – BxA | EMPEROR Eevee
3pts – BxA | Jackal

KI

9pts - Solumindra
8pts – NS | Gilgamesh
7pts - BxA | Jacka
l6pts - GrandPappyChris
5pts - MPII The Ronin
5pts – RedMufflerMan

PT

9pts - Fumbles
8pts - alxndr
7pts - TiZ
6pts – Player 5
5pts – AL | Arkayne

RULES

All tournaments are double elimination.

Players will be required to remain within audible distance of their bracket runner once the tournament begins. Failure to arrive after a call will put the player on a 4-minute disqualification timer. Players disqualified this way may be sent to the loser’s bracket, and also eliminated from the event. Players who are disqualified are entitled to a refund of the entry fee, and also their venue fee if they choose to leave.

Blind picks are available upon player request of a tournament organizer.

You may request a coach, who must follow the PowerUp private coaching rules. The link to the PowerUp Ruleset is below.

Stages will always be randomly selected.

No fatalities on the big screen. The tournament will be up on a giant projector screen, in full view of children visiting Arcade Legacy. We do not want any parents bringing complaints to our generous venue. Brutalities are not wholly controllable, and therefore they can be displayed on the projector screen.

For the complete PowerUp Ruleset, go to this link: http://www.powerupfighters.org/p/event-rules.html

Thursday, April 28, 2016

The Hadoken Files #001


Imagine this: you wake up, brush your teeth and then sit down to train for a tournament. You finally go to said tournament and find yourself placing kind of bad, or worse than last time you played. So you might be thinking “Maybe fighting games aren't for me.” Well I’m here to say that fighting games can be your best friend and it all depends on your mentality. That’s what this guide is about.


My goal is to help you approach fighting games with a sharper mentality by sharing my tournament experiences, my mentality, goals, training methods, other people’s experiences to help you adapt if you’re a new player in the FGC. Now I know what you’re thinking: “What makes this guy think he’s so qualified to tell me how to approach fighting games?” Well the thing is I may not be because I haven’t won any majors and I’m definitely not perfect by any means. Though I must say it is because of these reasons that I feel I can provide you with accurate information. I have won a couple of tournaments before, but the bigger picture here isn’t tournaments. It’s to get the most out of doing what you love the most; playing fighting games! So without further ado, I present to you, The Hadoken Files!

Making the Jump
If you’re a causal fighting gamer and you’re looking to cross over into the competitive scene, then The Hadoken Files are for you. I bet you’re tired of wrecking your friends back at home am I right? If so, congrats, but competitive play is a whole different ball game and making the jump may not be as easy for some as it is for others. So let me start off by telling you about my first time trying to move from casual to competitive, and then I'll tell you what you I wish I had known back then.

My very first tournament was when I was 17. Back then I was aware of the FGC but I didn’t know that Cincinnati had a scene at all. My friend told me that there was a tournament called "Rocket Punch" coming to a local place called Arcade Legacy. I trained as much as I could every day after school. When the day finally came I went out to the arcade to play. When I arrived I didn’t know anybody there, so I was definitely nervous. I had learned from tournament videos about how insulated the FGC could be. While I was there I kept to myself so that I didn’t rub anybody the wrong way. I wanted to be respected and as a result I was timid. When I was there I was warming up in MvC3's training mode. I didn’t say anything to anybody, but it didn’t take long before someone came up and asked to play. Then came even more players and I was really happy because I was nobody, and I originally thought that no one would want to play me. A few hours later the tournament started and it went like how I thought it would; I had 2 wins and 2 losses.

I wasn’t upset at my results because I went in there expecting good competition. My goal wasn’t to win; it was to measure how far I could go with solo training since I didn’t have other players to practice with. After that experience I was definitely planning on coming back. However, because of money issues and school I didn’t come back to the arcade until 2012 when I was 19. While my first tournament experience was enjoyable there were a few things that I wish I had done differently, and I want to share those tips with you! So let’s get to the "dos and do nots" of crossing over to competitive fighting games for the first time.

Finding Your Community
When crossing over, the first thing you want to focus on is where your city’s local players are. By local players I don’t mean your cousin that you play once in a blue moon. I’m talking about the players that are currently active when it comes to getting better at fighting games. Now most of the time the FGC is located at arcades or game shops, so if your city has an arcade try to check them out or check out certain game shops. Even card game shops might have a FGC player base. If you’re having trouble finding a community near you, check out www.shoryuken.com. They have a link that allows people to find communities around the world. If you find out that your area doesn’t have a local scene then don’t hesitate to play online. Online communities are available and valuable for your training.

Etiquette
As a player, I can definitely understand the appeal of trash talking. I mean we are video gamers after all! Trash talk is encoded into our DNA and we are inclined to make occasional witty remarks and comebacks. However, you must learn when your remarks are okay and when you are taking it too far. Many players I’ve seen struggle with this balance because they get so caught up in the moment that they just blurt out anything, and that can get you into trouble. Talking smack around your friends is one thing because your friends know you and know how you are. You and your friends have a bond that leads to an understanding among yourselves. The thing you have to remember is that it is only among yourselves. 

There were plenty of times when I witnessed players get into disputes because of what another player said. Sometimes, a dispute erupted just because players bumped into each other and neither wanted to say sorry. Remember we are in the FGC to play games and make friends; not start drama. Treat players how you would want to be treated and don’t be disrespectful to people you don’t know. Players tend to ignore, and not play, people that rub them the wrong way. So you would be losing potential training partners. Of course this isn’t true for everyone, but you should still be respectful because disrespect and conflict can effect you in a bad way.

Losing is a Part of Winning
When we lose we feel like there is something wrong with us and we start asking the big questions: “Why did I do that? What’s wrong with me? Why am I playing this game?”. I promise that nothing is wrong with you, grasshopper. Seriously though, we all lose at times and it is important that you learn to treat your loses as opportunities. It is thanks to these opportunities that you can see your flaws and improve on them. Learn from your mistakes and you can potentially improve your skills tenfold! No one gets worse from losing. If anything, winning all the time can be a bad thing because you don’t learn as much from a win compared to a loss. So the next time you lose just take a minute to reflect on what you did wrong and try to adjust from there via training mode, causal play, etcetera. Don’t be discouraged and don’t quit. The road to success is long, and there are no shortcuts.

To wrap this up there is one more thing I want to suggest. Have fun! I know it sounds simple but it is probably the most important thing that I can advise to new players. I think that the intenseness of competitive play can cause players to forget to have fun. If you remember to enjoy playing your game, you will find yourself playing at your best the majority of the time. That's all from me! Thanks for reading this and I hope you new players got something valuable from reading this Hadoken File. Last but not least, welcome to the FGC! 


Tuesday, April 26, 2016

PowerUp Spring Series 2016 - Meet 1 Results



Big thanks to: Jesse Baker, NS | Gilgamesh, BxA | EMPEROR Eevee, TiZ, alxndr, BxA | Jackal, Steel, and anyone I am unfortunately forgetting at the moment.

Things went pretty well! Smash.gg worked well, and so I am excited to continue using the website for pre-registration and brackets throughout Spring Series 2016. The only hiccup was that some players who pre-registered did not show up, and so were put in the bracket on the off chance they would be late. They did not end up showing, and so the bracket had unintentional byes. This will be fixed with a more organized sign-in at the front desk. Thanks for your patience and understanding!

WINTER CHAMPIONSHIP RESULTS
 




SPRING SERIES MEET 1 - FULL RESULTS
MKXL
1st - AL | Mod
2nd – Action Jackson
3rd - Hornett
4th – Mad Marx
5th – AL | Arkayne
5th – NB | Squall
7th – MPII The Ronin
7th - J
9th - GrandPappyChris
9th – TSS | Terror
9th – BxA | EMPEROR Eevee
9th – BxA | Jackal

SFV
1st – 0tter
2nd - Mod
3rd - Mod
4th - Plum
5th - Servo
5th - NB | Squall
7th – NB | ZachInABox
7th - Ailerus
9th – NB.DCB | ElitheCurry
9th – AL | Arkayne
9th – MPII The Ronin
9th - Hornett
13th – TigerZord92
13th – NB | immortal
13th - Steel
13th – Derrick Legend
17th - Solumindra
17th - SOQIO
17th - RedMufflerMan
17th – Mad Marx
17th – FeS | Matto
17th – Dual Kevin
17th - Tama
17th - Trickster
25th - Ryujin

PT
1st - Fumbles
2nd - alxndr
3rd - TiZ
4th – Player 5
5th – AL | Arkayne

KI
1st - Solumindra
2nd – NS | Gilgamesh
3rd - BxA | Jackal
4th - GrandPappyChris
5th - MPII The Ronin
6th - RedMufflerMan

UPDATED POWER RANKINGS

MKX
9pts - AL | Mod
8pts – Action Jackson
7pts - Hornett
6pts – Mad Marx
5pts – AL | Arkayne
5pts – NB | Squall
4pts – MPII The Ronin
4pts - J
3pts - GrandPappyChris
3pts – TSS | Terror
3pts – BxA | EMPEROR Eevee
3pts – BxA | Jackal

SFV
9pts – 0tter
8pts - Mod
7pts - Unlucky
6pts - Plum
5pts - Servo
5pts - NB | Squall
4pts – NB | ZachInABox
4pts - Ailerus
3pts – NB.DCB | ElitheCurry
3pts – AL | Arkayne
3pts – MPII The Ronin
3pts - Hornett
2pts – TigerZord92
2pts – NB | immortal
2pts - Steel
2pts – Derrick Legend
1pt - Solumindra
1pt - SOQIO
1pt - RedMufflerMan
1pt – Mad Marx
1pt – FeS | Matto
1pt – Dual Kevin
1pt - Tama
1pt - Trickster
1pt - Ryujin

KI
9pts - Solumindra
8pts – NS | Gilgamesh
7pts - BxA | Jackal
6pts - GrandPappyChris
5pts - MPII The Ronin
5pts – RedMufflerMan

PT
9pts - Fumbles
8pts - alxndr
7pts - TiZ
6pts – Player 5
5pts – AL | Arkayne



Meet 1 videos will be included in the Spring Series 2016 playlist below.

Playlist Coming Soon!

Thursday, April 7, 2016

Getting Nashty - A Journey of A Thousand Miles



People have said that a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. That was my goal when heading to Final Round 19 in Atlanta, which was actually 500 miles away. I have had respectable Top 16 results at large tournaments in Marvel vs. Capcom 3, such as PowerUp and Season’s Beatings, but Final Round is one of the biggest and toughest competitions out there. I tried to be realistic yet optimistic about my goals with Street Fighter V, and decided that making it out of pools would be my target. Achieving this would put me in the top 128 players out of more than 1000.

I was a bit apprehensive about such a long drive, especially since it was Saint Patrick’s Day; a day notorious for traffic accidents and trouble with the police. Although we did see some nasty collisions on the highway, the drive was quite tolerable. My friends Jake, Luke, and I listened to music and podcasts to pass the time, and the sweet drawl of Steve Austin inspired us to put in werk. We hit the road on Thursday evening and the tournament did not begin until Saturday morning, giving us plenty of time to reach our destination.

Friday was completely open for me to just hang out with my friends and play some casuals. Tournaments often create a conflict between performing at your best, and partying with people that you don't get to see very often. I made it a point to strike a balance between the two. It was exciting to watch the great matches in Marvel, Tekken, Pokken, Darkstalkers, and many more. In true anime fashion, the Guilty Gear players were playing on the floor in the hallway as we arrived.
This serves as a warning to any respectable people that happened to be in the same hotel as the FGC: save yourself. There was even a setup for one of my old favorites: WWF No Mercy. Arturo had his stream setup in the main lobby, rather than in a “secret” hotel room. This let everyone enjoy salty suite matches without having to be in the cool kid group, and avoided the inevitable police visit once the room became too full and loud. Eventually a fight did manage to break out in the lobby and someone had to be thrown out. I took this as my cue to hit the sack.

Saturday, I was in pool 44 out of 64, meaning I would be playing in the afternoon. I am more of a morning person, but gaming tournaments are usually late at night. Two people from each pool would be advancing, creating an elite bracket of the top 128 players for Sunday. There were definitely some logistical issues that made the pool area very cramped and hot. There was a guy playing in a full fox outfit that I felt especially bad for.

Although there was some confusion about the brackets being posted online, it appeared that I had relatively good luck with mine. I only had to play some notable players from the West coast, and not any elite pros from Asia. I made some mistakes but was able to make it out of my bracket on the winners side. A Cammy player was my final opponent for the day. I won, but not easily. This is a character that will prove to be problematic for me in the future. On Sunday I woke up early due to some confusion on when the finals bracket would begin. I was excited to get in early and practice with some of the pros. I was treated to lengthy sets with SoCal legend Alex Valle, and New York Marvel pro RayRay. Valle made a joke out of my neutral game, but I was able to take a game here and there thanks to Nash’s lack of dependence on neutral. Still, this is going on the “to do” list for sure. RayRay highlighted the importance of meaty attacks, as he would use Chun Li’s jab on wakeup to stop my pressure constantly. He did not change this strategy until I proved I could stuff out his moves and capitalize with a counter hit combo. From then on we had some solid back and forth games.

When the bracket began I found I was up against Nuckledu. He was the top Guile in SF4, and one of the worst people to come up against. I tried to remind myself that I had it pretty easy up until this point, and dedicated myself to learning something win or lose, and learn I did. A player named Cubano Loco was my loser’s bracket opponent. He was in my earlier pool, but this time he beat me. I think I had become a little too satisfied with my performance, a little frustrated with the logistics of the tournament, and a little too hung over from the hotel room the evening prior.

My journey for the weekend was over, but my goal was met. My friends had a front row seat and some pizza waiting for me. Although I had only taken the first step into becoming a competent player, that’s all I could ask for at the time. It was a great weekend.

The following weekend was a local tournament called Alpha Attack at Arcade Legacy. I was definitely excited to try out some of my new knowledge. I ended up winning the team tournament with an R.Mika player. We fought a solid team of Birdie and Ryu that was able to reset the bracket on us in grand finals. Luckily, we were able to pull out a win after that. Although this was exciting, the venue really started to fill up afterward. The main event would be much more difficult. Players were attending from all over the Midwest. I had to play the Birdie specialist midway through the bracket. It turned out to be good fortune that he had beaten me in the team tournament because the knowledge of his tendencies helped me win the match. Shortly after was the most exciting match of the night between Mika and Zangief. It came down to the wire with momentum heavy rounds on both sides. Gief ended up taking the win with a little saltiness afterwards.

Eventually, I made it to the grand finals against, you guessed it, a Cammy player. My opponent used an unorthodox method of filling up his super meter and holding on to it in order to cut off my options. It took a lot of trial and error of being hit with Cammy’s critical art in order to understand what I could and could not get away with. The list of things I could get away with turned out to be very small.

In hindsight, I could have made better use of Nash’s ground game and apply more pressure in traditional ways. In the end, I was up 2-1 in the best of 3 fight and took another round, bringing it to “match point”. My opponent started changing up his tendencies and staying one step ahead. Cammy won the tournament, and I came in second place. The biggest thing I took away from this one is that I tend to “lock up” when my opponent takes a risk and let them get away with it. What I need to do is punish them harshly, and shut down that route one by one until they are forced to play honestly. I am too cautious.

The past two events were filled with ups and downs, wins and losses, but I am progressing. I’ve succeeded in taking the first steps. Better still, the path ahead looks clear and I know what I need to work on. The hardest part is often trying to figure out what I am doing wrong and this is not a problem for now. All I have to do is keep taking steps and not worry about how many miles are left to go. I am going to try to go to Chicago in two months for the next major tournament.